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Iran Unveiled; By Wendell Rodricks

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Through the ups and downs of centuries, monuments stand tall while highways criss-cross the country. They exist in peace, along with benevolent citizens and a delectable cuisine. What more reason do you need to jump on a flight to Iran?

Wendell Rodricks, fashion designer, writer and environmental activist from Goa, shares what he learned about Iran on his recent trip with Cox & Kings (published in HT and Mumbai Mirror). And no, it’s probably not what you expected…

 

The Quran shines as lights falls on it in Jame Masjid of Yazd

The Quran shines as lights falls on it in Jame Masjid of Yazd
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

“I went to Iran expecting Persepolis and nothing more. What I got instead was time to spend with friendly, beautiful people, see a wealthy country with great infrastructure and modern facilities, an ancient culture, fabulous Islamic art and architecture, delicious cuisine, huge bazaars and yes, Beluga caviar at Tehran Duty Free airport on departure.” – Wendell Rodricks

A Challenge Before The Challenge

Introducing Iran as your travel destination is like introducing your love interest to an over-protective family for the first time. Apprehension runs wild. Everyone doubts Iran’s intentions towards you. You’re made to look like a soldier who is going into war. They want to know what you saw in Iran that made you so blind to the obvious.

Mehbod, a 1800-year old town with old-school refrigerators called Yakhchals

Mehbod, a 1800-year old town with old-school refrigerators called Yakhchals
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

The obvious. What is the obvious? How do people know the obvious about a place without having gone there? They’ve probably read about it off the internet, or watched videos of terrorists claiming attacks on some part of some city the pronunciation of which takes a second or third attempt. Media portrayal, denouncements by friends, family lectures on fundamentalists…on and on it went. That didn’t stop Wendell Rodricks from going through with his plan. Come what may, he was going to Iran!

When Iranians Work Their Magic

A Qatar Airways flight took him from Goa to Doha, where Wendell had a short stop-over to look around the fantastic Museum of Islamic Art. He woke up to the city of Shiraz as the plane touched down in the early hours before dawn. Mortazaa Namwar, an affable guide, greeted him warmly before driving Wendell to the hotel. It didn’t take long for Wendell to see that there was more to Namwar than just a local showing tourists around his captivating homeland. That’s what Iran does. It’s what Iranians do. They forge relations. As the days went by, the glass built around Iran was smashed to bits. Iran revealed herself to Wendell.

The Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, the top of which looks like it has eyes on a mask

The Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, the top of which looks like it has eyes on a mask
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

Presenting The Women Of Iran

How does Wendell describe the people in one word? Friendly, or, over-friendly even. The women brought to mind a phrase, beauty with brains. Iranian women are open and chatty with tourists, they drive cars, and do not need bravery as a tool to walk about the streets after dark. Quite contrary to what was expected. The hijab, though worn conservatively in certain cities, is more like a head scarf which spills over to the level of the ponytail. Through most of his journey Wendell did get to see blonde-streaked, fringed, and luxuriant hair under the hijab.

Women in Iran let Wendell in on a little secret- they enjoy more freedom than the media allows the world to think; the women are stylish, great at conversation (open to it too), and enjoy life out in the city even after sunset

Women in Iran let Wendell in on a little secret- they enjoy more freedom than the media allows the world to think; the women are stylish, great at conversation (open to it too), & enjoy life out in the city even after sunset
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

Wait, Is This The Same Iran We Were Told To Expect?

Iran is quite chic, and quite a wealthy country. The planning is spot-on with wide highways. A joy to drive on. No bumpy rides here! Beggars and garbage are almost non-existent in the places he visited. Wendell did go hunting for both, but nada. If the smooth ride was not incentive enough, the highway journey also came cheap as petrol prices hover around Rs. 20 per litre. The restaurants along the way were hygienic and cooked up some fabulous food.

Iranian highways are dotted with trucker's restaurants which serve fresh food & savoury kebabs in a clean environment

Iranian highways are dotted with trucker’s restaurants which serve fresh food & savoury kebabs in a clean environment
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

The Cultural Capital Of Iran

Delightful in many ways, Shiraz is a playground of roses, greenery, and mesmerising monuments such as the 18th century Arg-e-Karimkhani Citadel, the maze of Vakil Bazaar and Bath, magnificent mirrored walls and ceilings and beautifully set up gardens of the Narenjestan Palace, not to forget the pink-tiled 19th century Nasir ol Molk Mosque. The tile work in all these places left him tongue-ti(l)ed, while the mirror work of the Ali ebn Hamze mosque was nothing less than dazzling.

The poetically designed blue tile & sandstone artwork of the Nasir ol Molk Mosque in Shiraz is just one among many other monuments around the cultural capital of Iran

The poetically designed blue tile & sandstone artwork of the Nasir ol Molk Mosque in Shiraz is just one among many other monuments around the cultural capital of Iran
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

Indian Gola In Shiraz

Sufi Saint Hafez’s mausoleum and garden is where Wendell went to see the sun retire into the night. He indulged in an Iranian version of falooda, and shaved ice laden with lemon and pomegranate juice (remembering the Indian gola!) at the garden café.

Wendell headed to the mausoleum of poet & sufi saint, Hafez, where one may sit back & Iranian delicacies

Wendell headed to the mausoleum of poet & sufi saint, Hafez, where one may sit back & savour Iranian delicacies
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

Shatregan Restaurant is quite a hit with the tourists, and Wendell found out why. The Lamb Shashlik Chops and Koobideh Mince Kebab were extremely appealing. Not leaving the vegetarians behind, the brinjal and tomato shashlik with rice was delicious too. The flavours won his heart and one meal had the power of bringing together the sweet taste of six vegetables!

Indian Dream In Shiraz

Wendell had pretty much one place in mind all his life whenever he thought of Iran. Or rather, the said place is why he had Iran in mind at all- Persepolis! It is a few hour’s drive from Shiraz and the biggest tourist attraction. He had dreamed about this so much that he didn’t see the shock coming. Shock of the scale, the grandeur, the magnificence, and the dramatic visual beauty of the Persepolis. Once the capital of Achaemenid kings, it is where the palaces of Darius, Xerxes, and Artaxerxes stand. The city was plundered and torn apart by Alexander the Great, and these very ruins paved the way for an on-site museum. Columns rise high above the ground, stone reliefs convey the glory of the Persian court, and rock structures are testimony to a great empire that ruled across Asian and African continents. Wendell was so overwhelmed by Persepolis that had it been his only experience in Iran, he would have been satisfied.

Entrance to Persepolis, the ruins of which are UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Entrance to Persepolis, the ruins of which are UNESCO World Heritage Sites
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

 The tombs of Darius, Xerxes, & Artaxerxes have been carved into the rocks of Sassanian Reliefs

The tombs of Darius, Xerxes, & Artaxerxes have been carved into the rocks of Sassanian Reliefs
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

Located not too away far from Persepolis is Naqsh-e-Rostam, the royal tombs of three Persian greats (buried high in the cliffs) and Sassanian rock reliefs. What is amazing about this site is the intricate architecture. The tomb of Cyrus the Great sits aloof some seven kilometres away at Pasargadae in the spread-out plains of Dasht-e-Morghab.

Tomb of Cyrus The Great, sits alone on the Morghab plains of Iran

Tomb of Cyrus, The Great, sits alone on the Morghab plains of Iran
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

Sand Mountains & Turkish Bath (Hamam) In Kerman

Leaving Shiraz behind for Kerman was tough for Wendell, but the road promised new adventures. Adventures through pretty salt lakes, olive orchards, fields of pomegranates, figs, and mountains. He suggests you explore Kaluts desert early in the morning to avoid scorching temperatures which hit the desert during the day. It is known to touch 72°C in some parts. Salt and sand towers, complemented by sand storms and high wind, create a special design for Kaluts. Sand mountains are everywhere, and Wendell climbed one of them to be rewarded with an enchanting view unlike anything he had seen in all his travels.

Kaluts Desert is an unusual natural phenomenon of wind, salt, & sand working together for centuries to create marvellous structures

Kaluts Desert is an unusual natural phenomenon of wind, salt, & sand working together for centuries to create marvellous structures
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

The drive continued towards Mahan and the cool cocoon of the Shazdeh Garden. A looming snow-capped mountain towers upon this 19th century garden and house from the Qajar period. The fountains sizzle with their cool water, and Iranian families go all out on fresh sweet melons, saffron rice, dried fruits, nuts, and fragrant grilled meat on coal. Picnic spots around the world have some serious competition with this garden.

The incredible dome ceiling with perfect angles in the hamam at Ganjali Complex

The incredible dome ceiling with perfect angles in the hamam at Ganjali Complex
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

The Ganjali Khan complex in Kerman is where Wendell went to strike a Turkish Bath off his list. This hamam is exquisitely furnished with blue tiles and painstakingly detailed artwork. In the hamam for women, there are Iranian dresses from around the country put on display. Textile and costume fanatics are certainly in for a surprise.

Iranian garb on display inside the hamam for women in Ganjali Khan Complex of Kerman

Iranian garb on display inside the hamam for women in Ganjali Khan Complex of Kerman
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

Sibling Of The Parsi Dhansak In Max Sofrakhane

The Sofrakhane way of dining is a traditional Mediterranean style where a group of people sit together on a carpet and eat in harmony. Wendell found instant delight in the Abughoost (Dizy) stew with lamb, onions, potatoes, and grams at Max Sofrakhane, where the meat is kept aside and the rest is pestled into a sauce. He claims it is a sibling of the Parsi Dhansak.

Sofrakhane style of eating out in Iran is a must do, says Wendell

Sofrakhane style of eating out in Iran is a must do, says Wendell
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

Along The Ancient Silk Road To Yazd

Moving on (not quite) from Kerman, Wendell journeyed along the famed Silk Road to Yazd and the Zoroastrian Fire Temple. Tempted to see the Kariyan fire (which has been burning for more than 1,500 years) Wendell gave up the option to stop by the several Caravanserais along the highway. He was overwhelmed by the sacred flames, and paid his respects twice before going to the 17th century Zoroastrian Towers of Silence close by.

This is Zeinodin Caravanserai, one  among a thousand or so caravanserais along the Silk Road

This is Zeinodin Caravanserai, one among a thousand or so caravanserais along the Silk Road
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

Yazd is an ancient city with a lot of wind towers. It is a centre of Zoroastrian culture. Wendell tried to cover as much of the city as he could, right from the spectacular Jame Masjid to the distinguished Dowlat Abad gardens. He swears by the Water Museum, Daraee (Ikat) fabric, and Termeh fabric here. Wendell recommends you see the Amir Chakhmaq Complex lit up in all its glory.

This is mastery over tile-work; the blending in of the calligraphy with the blocks is amazing art in the Yazd Mosque

This is mastery over tile-work; the blending in of the calligraphy with the blocks is amazing art in the Yazd Mosque
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

Isfahan: One Of The Prettiest Cities Of Iran

Next on his tour was the pretty city of Isfahan. En-route he stopped by an 1800-year old mud brick town called Mehbod, where he walked around Narin Qal’eh- one of the oldest castles in Iran. The love for wind towers extends here as well, with Yakhchals (dome-like structures which are antique refrigerators used to store ice). Another stop was at Na’in desert where there is a Jama Masjid without minarets.

Armenian Cathedral of Vank in Isfahan; murals here depict life of Christ right up to resurrection

Armenian Cathedral of Vank in Isfahan; murals here depict life of Christ right up to resurrection
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

Isfahan showed Wendell how a night on Naqsh-e Jahan Square can bedazzle anyone. When it was first built, the square was arguably the largest of its kind in the world. Wendell is still not over the sheer enormity of this place.

This mural depicts Humayun's visit to the Shah of Persia to plan his rule over India

This mural depicts Humayun’s visit to the Shah of Persia to plan his rule over India
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

The Final Stop-Over

The last leg of his journey was in Tehran, but before that, Wendell made a quick stop at the Tabātabāei Historic House in Kashan for the badgirs (wind-catchers), rose water, rose tea buds, and rose petals.

The sheer enormity of the Imam Khomeini Mausoleum in Tehran

The sheer enormity of the Imam Khomeini Mausoleum in Tehran
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

Wendell was invited for dinner by a local in the posh, northern area of Tehran. When in Iran, grab at any chance to dine at a local’s home. The experience will stay with you forever, because Iranians are extremely hospitable and their tables are never free from the delicious weight of food. Tehran is cocooned by the Tochal mountains which safeguard the many famous landmarks of the city–the fountains, the dazzling salon mirrored rooms, and the royal Marmar throne of Golestan Palace, the National Museum which holds testimony to a great inheritance of the Iranians with objects that date back to 7600 B. C., the grand Imam Mosque with the Ayatollah Khomeini tomb, Tabiat Bridge designed by a lady architect, the Sa’ad Abad Palace and Mellat Palace in North Tehran, and Azadi Tower.

Golestan Palace in Tehran impresses with its scintillating mirror work & the grand Marmar throne

Golestan Palace in Tehran impresses with its scintillating mirror work & the grand Marmar throne
Photo courtesy: Wendell Rodricks, via Instagram

 

Wendell walked into his date with Iran with both eyes open, but still he got blind-sided. Iran took his breath away, its beauty hit him hard, his knees buckled, and he fell right over. Sounds like the acting out of an emotion we all know well, right? His date is over, but the romance will live on.

See Iran through Wendell’s lens on Instagram.

 

Please leave your thoughts in the comment section below, and click here to book this Iran tour with Cox & Kings

 

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Cox & Kings

Cox & Kings is the longest established tours and travels company in the world. Established in 1758, we are headquartered in Mumbai with a presence in over 13 countries worldwide. Our services include destination management, domestic and international holiday packages, luxury travel, business and MICE, NRI and foreign exchange solutions, as well as insurance.

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